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Edinburgh

We arrived during the festival rush in August. Somehow we still managed to get a place in a hostel that was affordable and were soon off to explore the city. One of the highlights is the view looking back from Arthur’s seat.

Just walking through the streets in the city center takes you past the different spots were people perform.

What one doesn’t see in the photo is the organisation “behind the scene”. The performance is timed and volunteers hold up signs with the remaining time.

What is also omnipresent is the castle up on its hill overlooking most of the city.
Sometimes it is so full of people that the city is almost disappearing behind the bustle in the streets. Our hostel was in a quieter zone close to this church.

It was nice to get out of the busy city center for a while and there it was also easier to prepare the last details for our flight to Berlin.

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Glasgow

In Glasgow we arrived at the Queen’s Street Station and went straight to the lost and found office. Again, no sign of our guitar. We got to our hostel and soon were off again, cycling through half the city to get to our date with Maggie.

We spend the night in a relaxed bar and had a lot of stories to share as we hadn’t seen each other for more than three years.

On our way to the necropolis the next day, we made one final attempt to get our guitar back. The people at the train station already knew us and made long faces. One of the guys asked us again how the guitar looked like with the attitude that someone has if doing something out of obligation and not because of any chance of success. Then he went around the corner and immediately reappeared with a smile on his face and our guitar in his hand. What a relieve and we couldn’t thank them and the person who turned it in enough.

In a mixture of a touch of lightness and a bit of disbelief we continued to have a look at the cathedral.

The Necropolis on a rainy day has a special atmosphere that made it worthwhile. We had a few more lazy days at the hostel and then made our way along the canals to Edinburgh. It was a nice enough route so close to the industrial belt of Scotland and there were some interesing parts like this tunnel we had to cross.

We had a few more lazy days at the hostel and then made our way along the canals to Edinburgh. It was a nice enough route so close to the industrial belt of Scotland and there were some interesing parts like this tunnel we had to cross.

And these gigantic horse heads, that entertained us while we waited for our warmshowers host.

After a lovely breakfast with freshly baked cereal, we were ready to tackle the last bit to Edinburgh.

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Rannoch Moor

Our journey started with a trainride along the West Highland Line, that i would recommend if you are travelling through this part of Scotland. While we waited at the train station in Arisaig, one of the steam trains frequenting this line passed through.

The train ride was amazing. Still stunned by the beauty, we got off the train and forgot our guitar in the overhead compartment. When we realized our mistake, it was already too late. We heard the train doors shut and the train leaving with me running after it and screaming. As it sank in, there was little we could do and we sat a while in silent shock. We called the train station in Glasgow and were given little information what might happen to a guitar travelling all by itself and where it might turn up.

Sadly we rolled down the lonely road leading from the station and just camped next to the road. The beautiful scenery deserved better onlookers than we were at that moment.

These photos won’t give you any impression on what level our hope was to ever see our guitar again. And also not, that after the rather traumatising tick bites on Skye, that we now shared our home with a whole family of ticks. Including further relatives until the great-uncle’s niece’s cousin.

The next day i boarded a train to Glasgow to investigate at the lost and found office. The conductor was extremely helpful and tried to enquier with her cellphone, but to no avail. I returned in the afternoon, with no result. After some debate we decided to continue our trip and try to investigate further with phone calls in order to track down the guitar.

The route towards Pitlochry was beautiful and while we were already starting to give up on the guitar, we decided to at least make one more attempt in Glasgow. Since our friend Maggie from Canada would also be in town, there would be a reason to celebrate.